07 October 2015

Evaluating China’s Conventional Military Power: The Naval and Air Dimensions

Andrew S. Erickson, “Evaluating China’s Conventional Military Power: The Naval and Air Dimensions,” in Jae Ho Chung, ed., Assessing China’s Power (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), 65-90.

Editor’s Summary

“Andrew S. Erickson, in chapter 4, evaluates China’s conventional military power, focusing particularly on its naval and air capabilities. Erickson’s assessment is that China’s military modernization has a rapidly improving but still mixed record of progress. At this point, he observes, China still lags behind the United States in many key aspects (i.e., longer-range projection capabilities and software), and Beijing by no means poses a “peer competitor” problem for Washington. Nevertheless, Erickson suggests that China has been fairly successful in leapfrogging in certain areas and, therefore, the narrowing capability gap particularly in the Near Seas and their immediate regions—where China seeks a zone of exceptionalism to safeguard its “core and vital interests”—will be a growing challenge for the region and the United States.”

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON EDITED VOLUME:

Jae Ho Chung, ed., Assessing China’s Power (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015). 

Click here for the Table of Contents, First Chapter, and Index.

From the Publisher

The topic of China’s rise and what it really means for the global and regional order is the subject of intense debate in scholarly discourse and media around the world. While some are confident that China will rise to the level of an equally powerful competitor to the United States, others are more cautious. Assessing China’s Power engages with this ongoing debate through empirical, sector-based, and systematic assessments of China’s power. Top scholars address China’s power today, compare China’s power with that of the USA, and forecast China’s power in 2025. This volume offers persuasive accounts of where China stands out, where China still has room to improve, and where China’s comprehensive power is and will be situated within the hierarchy of the international system.

Areas Covered

Reviews

“China’s growing power and what it means for the rest of us is the topic of the decade. What we lack is an objective, balanced, and systematic evaluation of just how powerful China is. This volume, the work of 13 outstanding China specialists, goes a long way to filling the gap.”

—Richard Bush, Brookings Institution, USA

“This edited volume on China’s power contains contributions by some of the best China scholars in the world. One may not agree with all the views in it but, given the sophistication of the analyses, this book is a must read for those who wish to understand the future.”

—Jia Qingguo, Peking University, China

About the Editor

Jae Ho Chung is Professor of International Relations and Director of the Program on US-China Relations at Seoul National University, Korea. His books include Central Control and Local Discretion in China and Between Ally and Partner. He is also the founding coordinator of the Asian Network for the Study of Local China.